National Dialogues on Behavioral Health Conference 2020

Implementing Crisis Response at State and Local Levels: New Paradigms, Partnerships and Innovative Approaches

The 61ST Annual Conference (1st Virtual Conference)

Date: 1 Session – Each Thursday September 17 – October 22, 2020

Time: 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm ET

This year the focus of the National Dialogues on Behavioral Health conference that is usually convened in New Orleans was going to focus on cutting edge and innovative approaches to behavioral health crisis response at both state and local levels. But then, another crisis came along almost to underline the importance and significance of the topic that we had selected.  The behavioral health world, including its crisis response systems, has been scrambling to adapt and adjust to the new realities of the Covid-19 Pandemic. We thought it was critical that we take these new realities into account, both in terms of conference content and conference format, to dialogue on this important topic. Join us for 6 consecutive weeks as we address the emerging issues and innovations related to behavioral health crisis response in this new environment.

Conference Rate

ONLY $100.00 for all six sessions or ONLY $25.00 for each individual Session

For more information and to register for the conference:

Continuing Education Credits Applied for and Pending for Social workers

Agenda

Session 1: Thursday September 17th

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CRISIS RESPONSE AND COVID 19: NATIONAL, STATE AND LOCAL RESPONSES

Several states have provided leadership and developed models for adapting behavioral health services and crisis response to the current Covid-19 pandemic. This has happened in tandem with development of national guidelines for behavioral health crisis response and the implementation of a national 988 crisis response access code. Local entities have also made unique and innovative changes. This session will provide an overview of the changes and adaptations that are currently occurring nationally in the area of behavioral health crisis response.

Presenters: Paul Galdys, MBA, CPRP, Deputy CEO, RI International; Judy Fitzgerald, Commissioner, Georgia Department of Behavioral Health; Rochelle Dunham, MD, Executive Director, Metropolitan Human Services, New Orleans, LA


Session 2: Thursday September 24th

CRISIS RESPONSE FOR PERSONS WITH SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS: WHAT WORKS

Funding has been made available through federal and state governments and private foundations for prevention, education, overdose reversal medications and outreach, and in and outpatient detoxification and treatment. Many of these efforts have not resulted in a substantial decline in overdose deaths, due to the influx of more potent and deadly synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and more recently, the Covid-19 pandemic. This session will address how communities are responding to the expanding use/abuse of opioids and adjusting their substance use crisis response systems during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Presenters: William Clark, MD, ER doctor and Coroner, Baton Rouge, LA; Tonja Myles, CPSS Peer Specialist, Set Free Addiction Resource Services, Baton Rouge, LA; Gloria Baciewicz, MD, and Patrick Seche, University of Rochester


Session 3: Thursday October 1st

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CRISIS RESPONSE AND PEER SUPPORT: THE EMERGING WORLD OF DIGITAL PEER SUPPORT

Peers are indispensable during a crisis and in linkages, system navigation and needed supports, both for mental health and substance abuse consumers. Peers support warmlines, hospital discharges, hospital ERs, and law enforcement and they provide supports related to community placement, job placement and community living. How have these supports been implemented during the Covid-19 pandemic? New models are emerging related to digital peer support.  This session will review best practices in providing such supports.

Presenters: Thomas Lane, Senior Director, Community and Recovery Supports, Magellan Health Services; Karen Fortuna, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire


Session 4: Thursday October 8th

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CRISIS SERVICE SYSTEMS – URBAN AND RURAL SERVICE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

The need for adaptation and flexibility to be more responsive has become apparent, even for evolving crisis systems, both in urban and rural areas. The panelists in this session will address best and emerging crisis response practices in these disparate settings at both state and local levels.

Presenters: Wayne W. Lindstrom, PhD, VP, Western Region, RI International, Inc.; Wendy Farmer, LPC MBA AVP Crisis Product,  Beacon Health Options; Mary Hoefler, MS, LCSW, Manager, Crisis Services Colorado DHS/Office of Behavioral Health; Mary Peck, Communication Director, Colorado Department of Agriculture


Session 5: Thursday October 15th

TECHNOLOGY, BEHAVIORAL HEALTH APPS AND TELEHEALTH PLATFORMS: BEST PRACTICES IN TECHNOLOGY AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

Digital Health encompasses a wide range of technology and artificial intelligence based applications including, telehealth, software that provides clinical decision support and mobile health applications (apps).   The onset of the Covid-19 pandemic has led to an acceleration in the adoption of these tools.  How are these tools used to address the needs of individuals at risk of, or who are experiencing a crisis? What criteria are used to determine the scientific effectiveness of clinical support and of mobile health apps of which there are literally thousands?  This session will address these issues.

Presenters: Lisa A. Marsch, PhD, Director, Center for Technology and Behavioral Health, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Dartmouth College; Kristin Neylon, MA, Senior Project Associate, NASMHPD Research Institute; Stephen Philippi, PhD/LCSW/CCFC, Chair, Community and Behavioral Health Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge


Session 6: Thursday October 22nd

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CRISIS RESPONSE FOR PERSONS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS (Intellectual Disabilities, Deaf/Hard of Hearing, Children and Adolescents)

Persons with special or complex needs are a subset of persons seeking crisis care that often do not get the recognition or special attention they deserve.  Persons with intellectual disabilities, persons with language and communication challenges (e.g. persons who are deaf, or non-English speakers), and children and adolescents, are part of this subset. What are the special issues they confronted during the Covid-19 pandemic? How were and how are these handled at different points in the crisis continuum? What are the implications for future interventions?  This session will try to provide answers to these questions.

Presenters: Steve Hamerdinger, Director, Office of Deaf Services, Alabama Department of Behavioral Health; Deb Pinals, Medical Director, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services; Kenneth Rogers, MD, Commissioner, South Carolina Department of Mental Health